Haitians in the Bahamas: Un éditorial du Journal The Punch

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Haitians in the Bahamas: Un éditorial du Journal The Punch

Post by admin » Fri Jul 11, 2003 12:41 am

Un éditorial du Journal The Punch June 12, 2003, p.7

[quote]UN SERMON DU BISHOP NEIL ELLIS

PLP bible-pounding preacher Bishop Neil Ellis-the personal pastor and religious guru of the PM-has been known to talk lots of nonsense and baloney.

But last Sunday, Bishop Ellis was talking "plenty sense" as he preached to his members at Mt Tabor Baptist Church in Pinewood Gardens. Rev Ellis was speaking of the illegal Haitian and Jamaican problem, which is escalating to crisis levels.

He warned PM Perry Christie that he should not recognize the 1985 treaty with Haiti to regularize all those Haitians who are in The Bahamas regardless of whether they are legal or not. Instead, he said any Haitians who were not here before Independence Day on July,10, 1973, should be shipped back to Haiti-and not on Bahamasair as it was "too expensive."


And he said that for every house the Government builds for homeless Haitians, they better construct a home in Farm Road-the PM's area. He pointed out that most Haitians in the illegal shanty town do not pay electricity, water, phone and property tax bills.

At the same time, they over-burden our schools, hospitals, housing, police, Defence Force, prison, customs and immigration departments. But Rev Ellis' most serious warning about illegal Haitians dealt with the violent Creole culture that Haitians and Jamaicans bring here.

He said Haitians and Jamaicans kill for petty reasons since life has little value in their homelands. And that evil killer culture is slowly destroying our civilised society.

He stressed that soon one third of the MPs in the House may be Haitian-Bahamians who have no idea what it is like to grow up in Long Island, Bimini, Exuma, Eleuthera, Abaco and other Family Islands.

Additionally, Haiti has no history whatsoever of democracy, free and f
air elections, basic human rights, or freedom of expression and the Press-and those same Haitian MPs may try to turn us into a Haiti-style secret police, 4th-world oppressive banana republic.

Of course,Rev Ellis was only repeating what Punch has warned about for years.

Most Haitian-Bahamians are hard working, responsible citizens, who make valuable contributions. We welcome them. But the fatherless and stateless drug gang Haitian males are a menace. They have no respect for anybody. And these jailbirds do not care who they murder, rape, assault, or rob.

Those hardened Haitian criminals and wreckers need to be deported for good! There are 50,000 Haitians out of our population of 300,000. And at the current rate of illegal entry, there will be more Haitians in The Bahamas then Bahamians in 10 years. So, Christie must act now and deal with the Haitian crisis. As Punch and Rev Ellis warn: "Don't let our nation turn Haitian!" And at this rate, if Christie fails to resolve the
Haitian crisis, pretty soon we will wake up as strangers in our own Bahamaland!

[/quote]

Pitit Ginen

Post by Pitit Ginen » Sat Jul 12, 2003 10:20 pm

A very clear ground for another Trujilio's kind of events that . . . I refuse to mention clearly. Some may not believe me. But every time I read stuff like that I got extremely sad. It is all the more hard to swallow that it is from other blacks. Those kinds of attitudes just tell us how stupid this world is. We might argue that this is a direct consequence of slavery brainwashing. Partly right, partly wrong! Those guys who are speaking, and writing like that are not stupid in any way. The church and the media in any society are very powerful. Anyone who dares ignoring the clout of those two sectors is very naive and careless. Rwanda started exactly like that, with a combination of those two sectors preaching hatred.

Saying that those brothers are misguided, brainwashed, misled will lead nowhere. We have to force our ridiculous government to take the necessary diplomatic measures to make sure that Haitians are protected wher
ever they are. By the way, lately after reading an article about the plight of my brothers in Guantanamo,
I was thinking: hey! I actually never saw in a newspaper an open letter from the Haitian government protesting the treatment of Haitians in Guantanamo; the cold-blood killing by white cop killers in the streets of USA, and elsewhere. By publishing an open letter in some media the Haitian government would send a positive signal to the Diaspora telling that community someone is paying close attention to their griefs and want to do something about them. Maybe our leaders do that constantly, I am just not personally aware of their diplomatic strategy. Maybe . . .

In the case of that article from Punch, what our brothers and sisters in this forum think that we, from far away, can possibly do about that threat hanging over our brothers' head? It is important to remember that what is happening to those brothers can happen to us wherever we are. Actually, in Russia racism has taken a violent tu
rn for a while now where blacks and mulattos are regularly beating and even killed with the blessing of those sick individuals in blue that represent the state>> (L' Intelligent, 18 au 24 September 2001 "Les noirs sur le qui-vive".)

It is interesting to underline that the attitudes described in the article we are concerned about are not specific to any place, region or people. Those kinds of gross hostilities are and can happen anywhere. I was stunned to discover that harsh reality through different sources I read. Lately in Cambodia, precisely on January 20 of this year, a mob torched the Thai embassy and Thai business in Bangkok, the capital of Cambodia (Eastern Economic Review, Feb. 27/2003. "Thaksin's unexpected call for help".) Another event of that sort happened on Nov. 1999 when Burkinabese (people from Burkina Faso) were attacked in Ivory Coast over a land dispute. That event led to a long halt of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Which diplomatic relations
start to resume only this year (J.A/L' Intelligent, March 23/29, 2003. "Ouaga face à la crise ivoirienne.) It is good to note that in both cases just mentioned, the governments of the victim emigrants took actions right away to protect their citizen away from home.

Is there any thing the Haitian government can and should do to prevent a foretold bloodshed threatening our compatriots? We better think about this very hot issue!!!

Pitit Ginen.

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Post by admin » Sun Jul 13, 2003 3:14 am


[quote]By the way, lately after reading an article about the plight of my brothers in Guantanamo, I was thinking: hey! I actually never saw in a newspaper an open letter from the Haitian government protesting the treatment of Haitians in Guantanamo; the cold-blood killing by white cop killers in the streets of USA, and elsewhere. By publishing an open letter in some media the Haitian government would send a positive signal to the Diaspora telling that community someone is paying close attention to their griefs and want to do something about them. Maybe our leaders do that constantly, I am just not personally aware of their diplomatic strategy. Maybe . . . [/quote]

Thank you for saying that! You are not aware, I am not aware either... and rightfully, we should be all aware of what sort of leadership emanates from Haiti in all those instances where the lives a
nd basic rights of Haitians are seriously threatened. I have seen the high powered ads in the U.S. News and World Report and the New York Times, inviting foreign investors to Haiti. I have seen some by-products of the tens of millions of dollars spent in lobbying fees to lift the embargo of direct financial assistance to the Haitian Government. I have seen the workings of advocacy for the affairs of the Haitian Government, but thruthfully when it comes to the affairs of the Haitian State and the welfare of ALL Haitians living in Haiti and overseas, for the most part we have been treated to the deafening sounds of silence.

What do most people make of the word "Diaspora" ? of the so-called Tenth Department ? of the ministry of "Haitiens Vivant à l'Etranger" ? Do most people see in those words Haitians toiling in the Bahamas and in the Dominican Republic? Do most people see in those words Haitian migrants in transit and our so-called boat people whose ships sometimes get fired at, by the powers tha
t be, in accordance to the national policing of international waters? Do most people see in those words the Haitians that arrive on Florida shores, alongside Cuban refugees, that are thrown in U.S. detention centers, the Haitians that is... ? Are all those people afforded the protection or advocacy of the Haitian State or its Government?

You correctly sense that something nasty is brewing in the Bahamas. It's been a long time in coming. The warning signs, we see them in Washington D.C., in New York City, in Miami, in the Dominican Republic, in Guadeloupe (last year, Widy recounted a frightful happening there on Ann Pale), and of course in the Bahamas where a discourse with ethnic cleansing overtones has been going on for a while. We KNOW where this is leading... we do not necessarily have to go back as far as 1937, because EVERY YEAR a number of our compatriots get assassinated in the Dominican Republic, with hardly a ripple in our national consciousness.

To go back to the specific issu
e raised by this post, I am glad this matter has caught your attention. I hardly think that any one of us would hold the answer to the dangers faced by Haitians in the Bahamas, due to heightened nationalistic instincts. I know that the problems caused by the unregulated migration of Haitians to the Bahamas are being addressed (to some level) by the chancelleries in Haiti and the Bahamas, but this is of little comfort to Haitians living there with the clamor of how much they are not wanted. What can we do, what should we do? Let's hear from others on possible solutions, but our own advocacy of Haitian Rights everywhere should also aim to enlist the burden of LEADERSHIP that comes with winning elections.

* *

Widy_

Post by Widy_ » Thu Jul 24, 2003 5:18 am

Sa mwen ka konstate adan peyi karayib yo, se kè lò yo bèzwen moun pou travay ba yo ( pou anyen) lò yo gen chantie, ou travay pou fè, èben an moman tala, tout moun sav touve ayisyen, men dèpi i gen pwoblèm ou kriz, se si prèmie moun kè yo ka konye.

Sa se oun pwoblèm kè fòk nou diskite serièzman. Kikiswa karayib angle, panyòl fwanse ou olandè, se menm biten.

Yenki gade, lò yo ni chantie pou fè, ki moun ou ka wè, se ayisyen. (men ki jan yo ka rive la ?)

Pa plis ki yè maten la la, mwen li oun awtik si gwadloup ki ka di kè youn madanm teka fè ayisyen vini ( pou yo travay) e i teka foure yo tout adan oun kaz. Lòw gade yo vini dekouvè sa e yo foure madanm la lajòl.

Kidonk se vre, se a ayisyen menm a fè oun deba si sa, pou wè ki moun ki ka òganize se jan dè depòtasyon sa, ki moun ki gen enterè nan sa, e ki moun ki ka òganize sa ?

Sa se vre, se jan dè politik sa yo, ka bay oun move imaj dè pèp ayisyen, men s
a pou nou wè la, se kè se se menm moun la ki ka òganize se trafik la sa, se yo menm a yo ki ka malpale travayè ayisyen apwe sa.

Mwen kanpe la

Widy

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