Having a baby in the midst of war and disaster

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Guysanto
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Having a baby in the midst of war and disaster

Post by Guysanto » Fri Jan 16, 2009 12:16 pm

Fares Akram: As waves of F-16s swoop, Gaza is no place to be nine months' pregnant

Wednesday, 31 December 2008

Independent.co.uk Web

It's not easy for anyone living in a city being pounded by Israeli F-16 fighter jets. But when your wife is in the ninth month of pregnancy and about to give birth at any moment it is nerve-racking.

On Saturday, when the first strikes started, I was at my office. I tried to call Alaa's mobile but the network was down. My mother, who lives next door, reassured me that my wife was fine.

In fact, Alaa was not fine at all. The impact from an explosion blew her to the wall after she tried to open the windows to protect them from smashing. My mother eventually managed to get her to the nearest clinic – the main hospital was in chaos dealing with casualties. The baby was fine but Alaa suffered from trauma. Staying in the house, as we've been doing for nearly four days, we've been clustering around the television for news.

Luckily, a few days before the start of the offensive, we had gone to the supermarket and stocked up on food in cans, peas, tinned sardines and a big lump of cheese. We're living on that. As we are refugees, we are also entitled to UNRWA food rations and got a sack of flour last month. With that, we can bake bread, provided there's electricity. I don't have a generator and sometimes the power cuts out when the loaf is half baked.

Prices of vegetables have gone through the roof as have the prices of goods previously smuggled in from Egypt since the Israelis started bombing the smuggling tunnels. We don't have much cash left now either, because the ATMs ran out 10 days ago. It is winter and very cold here in Gaza. In the night, we sleep, or try to sleep, with the windows half open because closing them completely means the glass will shatter and fall on us due to the tremors the air strikes generate.

On Monday night/Tuesday morning, the air strikes were so intensive that we lay there as the whole building shook. One of the bombs struck about 200 metres away. To calm Alaa, I suggested that we count the explosions for the coming hour – we counted 13 blasts.

We spend much of the day on the telephone to friends and family. Most of the people I know blame Hamas for this crisis. They seized power in Gaza by force and we are all paying the price.

But I'm aware that this view is not representative of most opinion here. For most Gazans, Israel are the aggressors. It is simply a fact that any Palestinian group will gain in popularity if they come under attack by the Israelis. People here also take the view that there is no comparison between what is happening to us, and to the suffering of Israeli border communities affected by the crude home-made rockets launched at them.

Gaza is a prison. If I could get out with all my extended family, I would go.

Now Alaa is fretting about how we'll get to the hospital when she goes into labour. We're thinking about alternatives to the hospital. In the meantime, we keep praying that this round of miserable violence will end before our daughter comes into the world.

The writer is a Gaza-based human rights researcher and journalist

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Fares Akram: My daughter Somaya's birth is the first light i

Post by Guysanto » Fri Jan 16, 2009 12:36 pm

The Independent's reporter in Gaza has lost his father and home to Israeli bombs – but today he is celebrating

Friday, 16 January 2009

Independent.co.uk Web

It has been the bloodiest, most violent day yet here in Gaza City. Israeli tanks came in from the south, shelling and bombing in the residential areas. But even with this death, bloodshed and chaos all around us, we are filled with joy. Twelve days after my father was killed by an Israeli airstrike, our first baby has been born, healthy at 3.8 kilos, with dark hair, just exactly as her mother wanted. I couldn't believe my eyes, seeing her for the first time. I kissed and hugged her softly. She cried when I took her in my arms.

On Wednesday evening as Alaa was in labour, there were signs of hope for an end to the conflict; we heard reports that Hamas had accepted the Egyptian plan for a ceasefire. "Perhaps our baby, and peace, would arrive together," I thought.

But overnight the Israelis escalated their attacks, targeting an area of the city called Tel al Hawa which is definitely not a Hamas stronghold. It is an area of big villas and where wealthier people live. I spoke to one of my friends who described terrible scenes, with injured people running into the streets. I called the International Committee of the Red Cross, they said they had suspended operations because tank fire hit the Al-Quds hospital causing panic and terror among survivors of earlier incidents. The UN building, struck by three shells, burned all day.

Alaa had been very frightened at the prospect of giving birth and, to make it even more terrifying, we could hear the bombing as we got in the taxi to the Shifa hospital. Conservative Muslim customs apply in public hospitals so I wasn't allowed in to the labour ward. It was disappointing, but Alaa's sister came out from time to time to tell me how it was going.

I knew the birth would take a long time, the doctors induced the labour. So I went down to the front entrance where the ambulances were arriving. From a civil defence fire engine, I saw eight wounded people taken out, all were civil defence staff still in their fluorescent jackets. A house near their base had been hit by a missile. They had rushed to evacuate the house but then another missile struck. It was a terrible sight. Most of them had their legs cut off from beneath the knee and severe shrapnel cuts.

All day yesterday, the Israelis intensified strikes on Gaza City and, at the emergency wing of the Shifa hospital, away from the calm of the maternity ward, the ambulances never stopped arriving. For 20 minutes, I watched the injured and dying coming in non-stop convoys of ambulances, ordinary vehicles, civilian cars, pickup trucks, anything that could be used to transport the casualties. Some of the wounded were burnt, some were cut very badly. Some were being sent directly to the morgue. I saw three cases where the medics did that. Most of the victims seemed to be women, girls, and children including a very small baby, wrapped in white blankets. Every day has been bad since this war began but this is the worst.

My mother joined us in the hospital. She managed to hold back the tears but I knew she was sad, thinking of my dad who would have been so happy to see his new granddaughter. And yet, I know that as one family member leaves us, another is born. It reminds you that life is a circle, a continuous thing.

We evacuated our home earlier this week, and then our apartment was badly damaged by blasts. After yesterday's violence, I feel we are not even safe in the hospital. I'm afraid for my wife and new daughter. I only hope Somaya's birth will be accompanied by the end of the violence and the killing. For our family, if not for the rest of Gaza, her birth is like a light in the dark.

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