U.S. mid-term elections: Some World reactions

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U.S. mid-term elections: Some World reactions

Post by » Wed Nov 08, 2006 3:09 pm

http://www.cnn.com

MADRID, Spain (AP) -- The seismic shift that midterm elections brought to Washington's political landscape was welcomed by many Wednesday in a world sharply opposed to the war in Iraq and outraged over the harsh methods the Bush administration has employed in fighting terrorism.

From Paris to Pakistan, politicians, analysts and ordinary citizens said they hoped the Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives would force President Bush to adopt a more conciliatory approach to the globe's laundry list of crises, and teach a president many see as a "cowboy" a lesson in humility.

But some also expressed fears that a split in power and a lame-duck president might stall global trade talks and weaken much-needed American influence.

On Iraq, some feared that Democrats will force a too-rapid retreat, leaving that country and the region in chaos. Others said they doubted the turnover in Congressional power would have a dramatic impact on Iraq policy any time soon, largely because the Democrats have yet to define the specifics of the course they want to take.

The U.S. ambassador to Iraq, Zalmay Khalilzad, said American policy would not dramatically change, despite the Democratic election success.

"The president is the architect of U.S. foreign policy," the ambassador said in a videotape distributed by the U.S. Embassy. "He is the commander in chief of our armed forces. He understands what is at stake in Iraq."

Regardless of the effect on world events, global giddiness that Bush was finally handed a political black-eye was almost palpable throughout Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

In an extraordinary joint statement, more than 200 Socialist members of the European Parliament hailed the American election results as "the beginning of the end of a six-year nightmare for the world" and gloated that they left the Bush administration "seriously weakened."

In Paris, expatriates and French citizens alike packed the city's main American haunts to watch results, with some standing to cheer or boo as vote tabulations came in.

One Frenchman, teacher Jean-Pierre Charpemtrat, 53, said it was about time U.S. voters figured out what much of the rest of the world already knew.

"Americans are realizing that you can't found the politics of a country on patriotic passion and reflexes," he said. "You can't fool everybody all the time -- and I think that's what Bush and his administration are learning today."

Democrats swept to power in the House on Tuesday and were threatening to take control of the Senate amid exit polls that showed widespread American discontent over Iraq, nationwide disgust at corruption in politics, and low approval ratings for Bush.

Bush is deeply unpopular in many countries around the globe, with particularly intense opposition to the U.S.-led war in Iraq, the U.S. terror detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and allegations of Washington sanctioned interrogation methods that some equate with torture.

Many said they thought the big gains by Democrats signaled the beginning of the end of Bush's reign. The next presidential election is in November 2008.

People across the Mideast also reacted swiftly, saying it appeared the U.S. president had paid the price for what many view as failed policy in Iraq.

Al-Jazeera television said on its Web site that the elections had been shaped "by an unpopular war in Iraq" as well as scandals at home and dissatisfaction with Bush.

Most governments across the region had no official comment, but some foes of the United States reacted harshly. "President Bush is no longer acceptable worldwide," said Suleiman Hadad, a lawmaker in Syria, whose autocratic government has been shunned by the U.S.

Even some Iraqis voiced hope for change.

"We hope American foreign policy will change and that living conditions in Iraq will improve," said 48-year-old engineer Suheil Jabar, a Shiite Muslim in Baghdad.

In Copenhagen, Denmark, 35-year-old Jens Langfeldt said he did not know much about the midterm elections but was opposed to Bush's values. He referred to the president as "that cowboy."

In Sri Lanka, some said they hoped the rebuke would force Bush to abandon a unilateral approach to global issues.

"The Americans have made it clear that current American policy should change in dealing with the world, from a confrontational approach, to a more consensus-based and bridge-building approach," said Jehan Perera, a political analyst. The Democratic win means "there will be more control and restraint" over U.S. foreign policy.

Passions were even higher in Pakistan, where Bush is deeply unpopular despite billions in aid and staunch support for President Gen. Pervez Musharraf.

One opposition lawmaker, Hafiz Hussain Ahmed, said he welcomed the election result but was hoping for more. Bush "deserves to be removed, put on trial and given a Saddam-like death sentence," he said.

But while the result clearly produced more jubilation than jitters around the world, there also were some deep concerns.

Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen told broadcaster TV2 he hoped that the president and the new Congress would find "common ground on questions about Iraq and Afghanistan."

"The world needs a vigorous U.S.A.," Fogh Rasmussen said.

Some also worried that Democrats, who have a reputation for being more protective of U.S. jobs going overseas, will make it harder to achieve a global free trade accord. And in China, some feared the resurgence of the Democrats would increase tension over human rights and trade and labor issues. China's surging economy has a massive trade surplus with the United States.

"The Democratic Party ... will protect the interests of small and medium American enterprises and labor and that could produce an impact on China-U.S. trade relations," Zhang Guoqing of the state-run Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said in a report on Sina.com, one of China's most popular Internet portals.

The prospect of a sudden change in American foreign policy could be troubling to U.S. allies such as Britain, Japan and Australia, which have thrown their support behind the March 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Democrats campaigned on a platform that demanded a change of direction in Iraq, and the war has lost the support of the majority of American voters.

"The problem for Arabs now is, an American withdrawal (from Iraq) could be a security disaster for the entire region," said Mustafa Alani, an Iraqi analyst for the Gulf Research Center in Dubai. "The Mideast could be left to cope with a disintegrating Iraq mired in civil war, with refugees fleeing a failed state that could become an incubator for terrorism."


Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Empress Verite

Corruption and the Iraq War

Post by Empress Verite » Wed Nov 08, 2006 5:14 pm

Sak Pase Staff and Jaf?:

I'm glad to see that others care. I live in Miami where this is going to have serious sound effect. I was wondering if any of you thought that this was going to echo in Ayiti/Haiti at all. I first heard it on International News Network (INN) a couple of days ago that Haiti had been found to be the most corrupt nation state in the world. It was posted on Corbett by at least 2 people and it was on Google and Heartbeat news. However, no one on this forum mentioned it at all. It really worried me and embarrassed me because I feared that many would try to make the wrongful connection between poverty and corruption. Poor folks are no more easily corrupted than rich folks and in fact in Ayiti, it would seem that as the report found that it was those in power who are the corrupt ones. As of course we see with the powerful Republikkklans. They have paid their price for the corruption (Abramoff, Enron etc... and the various child molestors, closeted gay (bashers) in their midst. And so what will happen in Haiti? I hope that all of the corrupt hightail it out of there pronto.

Finally, 2 very significant incidents happened in Miami recently that foreshadowed these recent elections. On the day before the elections, a tanker carrying fuel blew up almost right in front of a Catholic school attended mostly by Haitians. The Haitian church members held a prayer/singing vigil in the area of the accident and it was pretty scary. This incident caused fear and stopped traffic in North Miami (PetionVille) and I 95 for hours. Last night, a promising UM football player, Bryan Pierre Pata was shot dead in the parking lot of his apartment in Kendall (South Miami aka Duvalierville) he was one of 9 children and his parents are both Haitians. I mourn for the fear and the loss caused by these incidents. In light of the recent terror that the Haitian community survived in North Miami and North Miami Beach with a serial rapist stalking young women in their homes while they slept, (Troy (?) Dumas) a Haitian man in his late twenties/early thirties who had a long record of assault and sexual violence against others.

No one from the Haitian selected (mis)leaders came forward to make any kind of statement to the community anywhere. They were not around to reassure anyone or to mourn and help to heal anyone. This has got to stop. Folks who want to earn political respect have got to learn to do ground roots activism that reaches folks in the community on a personal basis. Let these political losses be a statement to them and to their henchmen in Ayiti who continue to fund their negativity and bad ways.

The following is a wonderful article about the significance of the outcome of the midterm elections and the emergence of the DemocRats as the new rulers. Will things change? As you pointed out Jaf, the DemocRats (to you some, but to me ALL) sound just like their nemesis.

(Democracy Now! also did a wonderful interview with Ralph Nader and others about this event).

Always in the struggle,
EV


-----------------------------------------------------------
US midterm elections: An overwhelming repudiation of the war in Iraq
By the editorial board
8 November 2006

With returns from the western states still coming in, the Democratic Party has won control of the House of Representatives by a comfortable margin, having ousted more than 30 Republican incumbents.

The Democrats appear poised to gain control of the Senate as well. They have captured at least three seats previously held by Republicans—in Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Ohio—and are leading, as we go to press, in the closely contested races in Virginia, Missouri and Montana.

Even if the Republicans manage to retain a one- or two-vote Senate majority, there is no questioning the fact that the election results represent an overwhelming popular repudiation of the war in Iraq. Exit polls confirmed what pre-election surveys had predicted: that the war was the issue uppermost in the minds of voters. A substantial majority of those who cast ballots favor a withdrawal of US forces from Iraq either immediately or within a few months.

While the election result is a debacle for the Bush administration and the Republicans, the Democrats are far from satisfied with the political situation that they presently confront.

The Democratic Party is the beneficiary of overwhelming antiwar sentiment that it did nothing to encourage and which stands in stark opposition to its own pro-war policy. There is a vast chasm between the massive antiwar sentiment within the electorate and the commitment of Democratic Party leaders to “victory in Iraq” and continued prosecution of the “war on terror.”

As the evening wore on and the political implications of the massive anti-Bush and antiwar vote became apparent, both leading Democrats and the cynical spinmeisters of the media sought to interpret the election results in the most conservative and innocuous terms.

New York Senator Hillary Clinton, considered to be the frontrunner to win the Democratic nomination for president in 2008, declared in her victory speech that American politics had to return to the “vital center,” and pledged her commitment to work with the Republicans in prosecuting the “war on terror.”

Needless to say, had the Republicans retained control of both houses of Congress, the media would have portrayed the election as a powerful popular endorsement of the Bush administration's war policy.

In fact, the vote reflects the broad and deep popular opposition not only to Bush, but also to the media and the Democrats, both of which backed the administration's war drive, promoted its lies about weapons of mass destruction and Iraq-Al Qaeda ties, and continue to support the mass slaughter being carried out by the US in the devastated country.

The outcome of the elections has revealed that the American people overwhelmingly stand to the left of the entire political establishment. It signals an intensification of the political crisis in the United States.

Those who voted for the Democratic Party in order to express their opposition to the Bush administration and the war will rapidly discover that a Democratic electoral victory will produce no significant change in US policy, either abroad or at home. Millions of working people and youth will sooner rather than later come into direct conflict with the Democrats.

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Nov 08, 2006 6:34 pm

Se avek yon grap plezi ke Repiblikin yo admet ke yo pran gwo so kabrit sa ki fese yo ate. Yo tombe fo, min Yo gen kouraj pou Yo leve e rekonet ere Yo. Repiblikin pap leve kokin, ni rele bare volo. Yo malin e yo se bon pedan e yo pare pou travay la min dan la min avek Demokrat yo!!

Gen anpil moun ki di ke se lage Irak la ki pote tout kandida Repiblikin yo ale. Mwen kwe ke lage Irak la jwe yon gwo rol nan zafe eleksyon sa e yo pap fe ase program sosyal pou peyi a..
Antouka, nou pedi san grate tet.

Sa ap sevi Repiblikin yo de leson e premye desisyon ke yo pran se retire Donald Rumsfield kom sekrete deta defans peyi a. Yo gen lot desisyon ke yap pran anko ki pou satisfe e rapwoche yo pi pre pep la.
Yo pral komanse travay sou febles you e travay sou edikasyon, sante, sevis sosyal lakay yo e kite lot peyi sa yo an repo.

Chavez, Castro, Lula, Ortega, Aristide e tout lot kamarad yo temet tounin sou pouwa anko.
Demokrat yo la an majorite, e yo pral ouvri barye ak lantouray pou mesye sa yo banbile jan yo vle. Nou pral tande vwa mesye sa yo byen fo anko e mwen ta souwete ke Leta Ayisyen profite de okasyon sa pou balance sevis sosyal nan peyi a.

Michel

Leonel JB

Apa li papa

Post by Leonel JB » Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:01 pm

Michel, ou pa'p swiv anyen!!

What about Montana and Virginia? De repibliken'w yo pa concede non papa!

Anyway, either a Republican or Democrat would only go accordingly to American interest!

The only difference, a Republican would sh.. over the Middle or lower class without any concern. The democrat would do the same with the only difference, He would provide an umbrella.

What about Compassionate Republican? He sees your pains. He has Compassion. But, He won't provide any Help!!! He only cares about a Fetus, But at the minute the Baby is born, you're on your own.

Anyway, going to Iraq was EZ. But, leaving won't be!!!!

Michel, ou tap fE kanpay!! Nou pa't tande'w menm.

Welcome back!

Tout moun te pale yo, yo pa't vle koute. Zo Iraq la kwoke nan gOj yo...

Run before it's too late!

Leonel

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:37 pm

Leonel said: [quote]Anyway, going to Iraq was EZ. But, leaving won't be!!!! [/quote] It could be EZ now since Donald Rumsfield is out, Robert Gates is in, and the Democrats are in power. They just need to work together and come up with a realistic plan where the majority of the Iraqi people could be happy regardless how long it will take. To make it happens.
Leonel di:[quote]Michel, ou tap fE kanpay!! Nou pa't tande'w menm. [/quote] Yes I was campaigning for a couple of black Republicans. Unfortunately, they plunged like a rock. Even black folks voted against them. Nan politik se pa yon zafe de koule min de intere.

Leonel : [quote]Welcome back! [/quote] Thank you Leonel.

Leonel di: [quote]Tout moun te pale yo, yo pa't vle koute. Zo Iraq la kwoke nan gOj yo... [/quote] Not only the Iraq war but also immigrations. The Latinos are still mad about this wall proposition between USA and Mexico and the immigration population mad about homeland security and deportation etc..
Nou we ki dega ke Republiken Haitien yo kap fe le ke yo gen pouvwa nan min yo. Kounyen la se tou pa Ayisyen Democrat yo pou montre sa ke yo kap fe pou repare dega sa yo.

Leonel, now you have the power, show us what you can do with it to help Haiti and your community abroad?
My advice to you Leonel is to do some PR work by sending letters with your organization letterhead to the Black Caucus members and the rest of the Democrats to congratulate them for their victory. They will send you back a thank you letter for your support. Frame these letters and put them all over your office. Send them a second letter and ask them to bring back our man from South Africa and the Haitian people would be greatful to the Democrats for bringing democracy back to Haiti again.
Leonel, as we know that the Republicans have been 2 PZ the Haitian people with bad policies for the past couple of years, Now the Democrats have the majority on the floor of the Senate and the House, what do you think Haitians should do to better address the needs (economic and social) of the Haitian people?
Leonel :[quote]Run before it's too late! [/quote] Thanks Leonel, I can run but I can not hide.

Michel

Empress Verite

Non Gracious Republikkklans

Post by Empress Verite » Wed Nov 08, 2006 11:11 pm

Guy:

Thank you for posting that article. I read it the first time I was on this thread a few hours ago but I forgot to post my reaction. I feel that the global implications of the recent midterm elections in the US are very important. In particular, the situation in Iraq and Afghanistan and perhaps the entire US foreign policy in the Middle East might see a different course. However, because of the kind of DemocRats who came into power-namely the Blue Dogs I am not optimistic that things will change much for the Palestenians and Lebanese who continue to struggle for their freedom. In addition, it is clear that they will forge ahead and attack Iran. The liberal conservatives do not support a 2 state system that will give or grant the Palestenians their freedom. Unfortunately, these are the same power brokers who are against Affirmative Action, a female's right to choose, and allowances for social welfare programs and so forth. They are Republikkklans in DemocRatic garb just like Joe Lieberman.

The WSWS also has a recent article on the history of US imperialism (around the world). I also recently read a great piece about the role of the UN, the World Bank and IMF and the US. While it seems that Venezuala will not get the seat on the security council, Panama has been granted one. And we will wait to see what that means for the region. I am not optimistic that the MiNUSTAH will be out of Haiti any time soon. In fact, in a weird twist, I read that the US is building an army base in the DR!Of course they've denied it.

And Michel: I agree with Leonel on the lack of grace that the Republikkklans have shown in this elections. Check out the dirty ads especially against the black man Harold Ford in Tennessee and the various other racist ads that depicted black candidates in darker faces than they really were (just to scare folks away!) And you should have seen the Criss ads against Davis! They were all about terrorism (one even referred to Arafat as one!) And they have not apologized at all. Leonel is right to point out that the Republican incumbent has not conceded in Montana and the Virginia race was not even that close. It was thousands of votes. I guess finally, the powers that be took their cue from GW and gave up the fight. Rumsfeld and Cheney, the old ideologues, are out and the new academics are in. At least we might get some 2 sided dialogue about these issues.

I know that these DemocRats will rush into North Korea, Iran, (perhaps Syria) and will force China to step in line. The rest of the world will have to put up with US brand of Democracy until a more fundamental change occurs. When it becomes mandatory for everyone to vote and the downtrodden are encouraged to get to the polls or vote through absentee ballots than we can be hopeful.

Lit la Kontinye.
EV

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Post by admin » Thu Nov 09, 2006 12:07 pm

[quote]The following is a wonderful article about the significance of the outcome of the midterm elections...

US midterm elections: An overwhelming repudiation of the war in Iraq
By the editorial board
8 November 2006[/quote]
Please, let's take care to identify ALWAYS the source of any article reprinted on this forum. That is an extremely important consideration. "By the editorial board" is not enough, so you should name the source and/or the internet address of any reprint.


[quote]The Democratic Party is the beneficiary of overwhelming antiwar sentiment that it did nothing to encourage[/quote]
Amen to that! The Democratic Party is just as guilty as the Republican Party, but since the Republicans were in a great position of power, and since the two-party system is so entrenched that no third-party seems viable in the U.S., then it was important to punish the Republicans for what happened on their watch. However, one should not forget that the Democratic Party's Victory simply reflects the resentment of misused power by the Establishment. I hope that the Democrats do not delude themselves about these elections, because they simply did not deserve to win outright. Let us just say that they won by default.

Joe Lieberman has been a disgrace, yet today he is in a unique position to get whatever he would like from both the Democrats and the Republicans (who hope he will switch formally to their side). That is truly sickening, when you think about it. There's a man, who has backed the Iraq war, as much as Donald Rumsfeld let's say, and yet he holds in his hands the balance of poweer. What were the Connecticut voters thinking?

Also, in New York, we have Hillary Clinton, who has been a hawk and ally of the Republicans on the issue of the Iraq War. Yet today, she and Joe Lieberman and countless other pro-war democratic congressmen are benefiting from the electorate's anti-war sentiment.

U.S. voters need to remind the Democrats that they do not need to glorify themselves, as they have displayed no backbone whatsoever as a party in the last five years. Of course, there have been exceptions to confirm the rule. Robert Bird of West Virginia has been one of those. Senator Edward Kennedy, on occasion. Senator Russ Feingold, certainly. But other senators have been singularly disappointing, including the democratic Senators of my home state of New Jersey and Senator Clinton from New York. Recall their votes on the most recent "terror bill" authorizing the U.S. use of torture and the denial of habeas corpus. They all acted so scared of President Bush and his infernal machinery. SHAME ON THEM for not representing us when it counted. However, now is a wonderful opportunity for them to show that they can roll back the previous excesses and revolting injustices of the Bush administration.

My two biggest disappointments of this electoral season is the fact that Joe Lieberman won re-election and that Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney did not even survive the primaries. That was the loss of a truly wonderful person and the most feisty representatives for human rights in the U.S. and abroad. I hope that Cynthia will get another chance. The rest of Congress hardly measures to her moral authority.


[quote]The outcome of the elections has revealed that the American people overwhelmingly stand to the left of the entire political establishment. It signals an intensification of the political crisis in the United States.[/quote]
I hope so, but it's a lot to hope for. These elections may be seen as the light at the end of a long dark tunnel. But is it truly sunlight or the light of a moving train speeding in our direction? Remember, the White House still has a lot of institutional support and is still controlled by the Bush cabal for the next two years. A lot of damage can still be done to the world, especially if the Democrats do nothing else than enjoy the perks of their new found power.


[quote]Se avek yon grap plezi ke Repibliken yo admet ke yo pran gwo so kabrit sa ki fese yo ate. [/quote]
Michel, ban-n van pou-n al Lagonav!

[quote]Yo tonbe fo, min yo gen kouraj pou yo leve e rekonet ere yo.[/quote]
Kilès ki di-w sa... se ak Karl Rove ou te pale? Mwen pa wè eksteryorizasyon grap plezi sa sou figi mèt-a-koken George Bush la. Epi misye toujou ap chèche yon viktwa ilizwa an Irak pandanstan lagè sivil la ap fèt, epi solda meriken ap kontinye mouri pou granmesi (nou pa menm bezwen pale pou viktim iraki yo menm, ke elit Washington lan pa janm konsidere nan kalkil yo). Men se pa fanmi Bush ni fanmi Cheney k'ap mouri! Se pa san yo k'ap koule. Ki te mele yo?

[quote]Repibliken pap leve koken[/quote]
Woy! Ou kwè ou konsyan sa ou ekri la?

[quote]Yo malen e yo se bon pedan e yo pare pou travay la men dan la men avek Demokrat yo!![/quote]
Rat soufle anvan li mòde.

[quote]Antouka, nou pedi san grate tet. [/quote]
Si'w te reflechi byen, ou ta wè ou pa pèdi, se genyen ou genyen. Oudimwen ou genyen posibilite pou ou fè yon pwen pi devan.

[quote]Sa ap sevi Repibliken yo de leson e premye desizyon ke yo pran se retire Donald Rumsfield kom sekrete deta defans peyi a. [/quote]
Que son âme repose en paix!

[quote]Yo gen lot desizyon ke yap pran anko ki pou satisfe e rapwoche yo pi pre pep la. [/quote]
Se ak yon grap plezi n'ap tann ou ban nou yon apèsi sou sa zanmi repibliken-w yo gen nan tèt yo pou yo fè.

[quote]Yo pral komanse travay sou febles you e travay sou edikasyon, sante, sevis sosyal lakay yo e kite lot peyi sa yo an repo. [/quote]
Se vre Michel?????????

[quote]Chavez, Castro, Lula, Ortega, Aristide e tout lot kamarad yo temet tounen sou pouwa anko. [/quote]
Ou wè jan ou anmèdan!!!!!

[quote]Demokrat yo la an majorite, e yo pral ouvri barye ak lantouray pou mesye sa yo banbile jan yo vle.[/quote]
Ou pap janm kite!

[quote]Nou pral tande vwa mesye sa yo byen fo anko e mwen ta swete ke Leta Ayisyen profite de okazyon sa pou balanse sevis sosyal nan peyi a. [/quote]
Mwen pa vle kwè nèg sa yo se eleksyon isit la yo tap tann pou ranmase karaktè yo. Michel, si detwa Ayisyen aji an restavèk, sa pa vle di tout Ayisyen se restavèk yo ye.

Empress Verite

WSWS-World Socialist Web Site

Post by Empress Verite » Thu Nov 09, 2006 2:50 pm

Guy:

In my haste I must have accidently erased the WSWS name from the article. The Editorial board is that of the WSWS from whom I get most of the articles that I post.

Thanks for pointing that out because I always want to give them credit of course.

And yes, the only person who did not vote for the war in the House was the good lady from Oakland, CA Barbara Lee who replaced Ron Dellums an old Lobbyist for Aristide and the Haitian government.

I don't know about Cynthia McKinney though. Did you see how she ran to shake hands with GW last year as he made his way into the House to give one of his anti-terror white supremist speeches? She lost again to someone (a man this time) who represents the more conservative side of the Black community in Atlanta. However, I feel that she made a lot of mistakes in her campaign. The first being that she underwent this rapid and radical transformation in her physical appearance. She made herself look more mainstream. And then like most DemocRats she went along with issues and played the game when they did not have to compromise they just did it because they could not help themselves. I guess it's hard to maintain your integrity sometimes. But I won't let them take away mine EVER again! I guess she'll go and complete her doctorate at Tuffs at this time and bid her time to run again when the atmosphere is more conducive to her perspective.

best ,
EV

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Post by admin » Fri Nov 10, 2006 2:15 am

[quote]I don't know about Cynthia McKinney though. Did you see how she ran to shake hands with GW last year as he made his way into the House to give one of his anti-terror white supremist speeches?[/quote]
I find this highly surprising since I have heard Cynthia make mordant critiques of Bush's so-called "war on terror". In one particular video, for instance, she spoke truth to power like nobody else's business. I can hardly picture her running just to shake hands with George Bush. I guess that with politicians one never knows, EV. But this does surprise me a lot, as she did not seem to be the type.

One good article I previously posted about Cynthia McKinney on this forum can be retrieved at http://annpale.com/viewtopic.php?t=6099
[quote]
I feel that she made a lot of mistakes in her campaign. The first being that she underwent this rapid and radical transformation in her physical appearance. She made herself look more mainstream.[/quote]
I was not aware of that. But how does she look more mainstream than she did in the past? Was she trying to pass for Condoleezza Rice's double? That's a scary thought.

Leonel JB

Illusion!

Post by Leonel JB » Fri Nov 10, 2006 8:09 am

The Republicans lost!

For the Senate, it is a draw. 49 to 49, remember 2 are independents. One of them is the Famous Joe Lieberman????

TEt kOk, Bouda Pentad!

He used the Democratic state of Connecticut. But, in reality he is more Republican than GW. He showed his face since Clinton Era...

Democrats or Republicans will always be 100 % pro-Israel! You Guys can do the math.

Now, Mich, I thank you for the advice. But, no thanks!

I don't wanna be plugged to any other Groups or Org. I did it myself and some members of my immediate Family. I always wanted to be the King of my Castle (I know, I am a silly Dreamer). Mwen pa vle ankenn Zenglendo itilize'm tankou Poupe twEl.

It is a Small budget Org which can do a lot of things ALONE. That does not mean We won't accept Help from Others. But, no string attached!

Merite pa Mande!

I can send clothes, shoes, food and pay some lousy 10 USD for a couple of kids to go to School without a Big Budget.

I always believe that WE (HAITIANS) can help the Country. We are about two Millions outside of Haiti. We spend so much money wastefully on silly things. But if we take 10 USD every month (cigarettes, marijuana, crack, fanm ak gason etc), this can really make a big dent to our Economy. In a month,we will send 20 millions. In a year, 240 millions USD for our Beloved Country. Our only problem, we can not trust others. We think that they are going to screw us (it does happen). But, believe me, this is the Real deal. H-O-H is for real! Nou paka fE lEd. Nou refize fE lEd. Paske, nou gen oun gwo Zouti ake'n. Li rele DIYITE!

Sorry Guys, let's go back to Mid-Term results.

P.S. Pa panse ke mwen gen anpil kOb non. OkontrE, m'ap bat dlo, pou'm fE bE. Men, mwen pran enspirasyon de oun gwo FrE'm ke yo rele FRANTZ JEAN alias PADEL. Ki fE oun kokenn chenn travay nan pO a Piman. Kidonk, ma'p swiv modEl sa'a. Pwochennman, ma'p wE si ma kole zepOl ak lOt Oganizasyon yo. Paske mwen konnen ke oun sEl dwEt pa manje kalalou...

L'Union Fait la Force.

Leonel Jean-Baptiste

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Post by admin » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:57 am

[quote]But if we take 10 USD every month (cigarettes, marijuana, crack, fanm ak gason etc), this can really make a big dent to our Economy. In a month,we will send 20 millions. In a year, 240 millions USD for our Beloved Country.[/quote]
Leonel, you are not being realistic. Take a deep breath, and let's discuss. There are many, many other Haitians who share your goals for their own regions. For instance, read about Dr. Mortel's story in St. Marc ("I AM FROM HAITI" by Rodrigue Mortel, MD). Everyone wants to encourage you, and none more than I, even though I have stayed silent on the subject so far, because the discussion needs to be framed better. The key is "effectiveness". Without it, you can build a lot of sandcastles that get washed away when the first wave arrives. Another key is "sustainability". What you want after all is development, true human development, not replication of discredited models that have not worked for Haiti in the past. When you send one dollar to Haiti, you have to think ahead about how that dollar will take root long enough to make another dollar. When you educate a child, do not assume that there is something tangible waiting for him at the end of his education. There are plenty of rhetoricians and philosophers in Haiti, if you know what I mean. Please think beyond the act of giving. I know you to be a most generous soul. I want to encourage your efforts. I hope that you and your wife are willing to sit down with and listen to a lot of folks like Frantz Jean, Rodrigue Mortel, Wyclef Jean, and a thousand others. You must have a CLEAR VISION, so you will not be tempted to go only for the low hanging fruit. Remember, Charity is not a model of development. You can be as charitable as you want, of course, but please think two steps ahead every time and be reasonably assured you know how it's all going to play out.

Well, we'll have time to talk out more on that subject.

Kenbe fèm,
Guy

Empress Verite

Cynthia McKinney

Post by Empress Verite » Fri Nov 10, 2006 1:58 pm

Guy:

(A lot of Haitian activists are enamored or taken with her and I recognized her as being the same African American types I met in school or other institutions who always behaved as if they knew how to be black better than anyone else especially a Haitian. (Although some like Alex Stepick have claimed that the African Americans have accused the Haitians of not being Black enough-(he said that in my class a few years ago. I don't know if he wrote it anywhere and I've read a lot of his materials on Haitians in Miami.) I think that he misunderstood and/or purposefully misinterpreted the situation based on 2 simple facts. The white folks especially my academic profs in Miami for instance tend to pit one group of blacks against another and they do this not only to divide and conquer but also to create bullies by giving them more power. I remember one prof in particular, Hugh Gladwin who lives in the heart of the Haitian community in El Portal claiming that his African American neighbors are always complaining about Haitians and saying nasty things to him about us. Stuff like how we stink and so forth. It seems to me that a compassionate and evolve person would refuse to listen to these insults and discourage them at all cost. They listen to them because they know that this is the African American folk's way of emphasizing their national birthright by expressing hatred for another more downtrodden black group to the white's in charge. They are in essence asserting their status as being more middle class or financially better off.) (I had just had to explain this point with those examples and I am sorry if you feel that it was long winded or off topic.) In short, I had no hope in McKinney, I just liked the fact that she was a politician with natural hair.

In reference to her running to shake GW's hand, she did it and it was on prime time TV. CNN, MSNBC, Fox and everyone commented about it. It was shocking. You can probably check those news archives for that. It happenned a couple of years ago when the prez was about to address the House perhaps at the time when he was receiving a lot of criticism regarding the Iraq war. It was gross to say the least but I knew that she was trying to get re-elected.

Also, I guess you don't watch as much tv or the news as I do. When she had the incident last year or earlier this year with the white house police who did not recognize her. She apparently walked in without showing her ID which is customary for reps to do. However, the guards supposedly did not recognize her because she had changed her hairstyle. Although it does not seem that she permed her hair she found a way to make it look as if she had Jerhy Curls and it was cut in a bob instead of her traditional braids or natural twist. In addition, she started to wear heavy makeup and changed her clothing style too. These makeovers are very popular and many have tried to get me to do them but I don't feel that transforming of changing myself in that way will necessary make my life any easier or get me what I want in life.

She took a risk and lost. She kept mentioning the idea of speaking truth to power in her concession speech but I did not get it at all. She apparently lost touch with her base and her constituency. In fact, the women members of the Black caucus have this kind of wishy washy attitude. The old chair of the caucus was being sued by her chief of staff for abuse and she was so upset about it that as a political active black woman that her own kind would "betray" her in that way and sue her! One white congressman had to remind her that she was a powerbroker and she had folks who worked for her and who were her "subordinates" and deserve to be treated with respect. Barbara Lee's office is full of those contradictions too. I was a victim of that 16 years ago in Oakland. (that's another long story). However, she too changed her hair style soon after her nay vote on the Iraq war. She stood out and made "enemies" she got a lot of hate mail and death threats and I guess she was advised to change her appearance to look more mainstream and less radical.


Finally, those reps make 6 figure incomes and I'm sorry to say that perhaps that alone puts them out of touch with the minimum wage earners whom they feel should blindly follow their lead. It's wrong and upsetting.

Best,
EV

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Post by admin » Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:26 pm

[quote]I had no hope in McKinney, I just liked the fact that she was a politician with natural hair.[/quote]

[quote]Although it does not seem that she permed her hair she found a way to make it look as if she had Jerhy Curls and it was cut in a bob instead of her traditional braids or natural twist. In addition, she started to wear heavy makeup and changed her clothing style too.[/quote]

[quote]Barbara Lee's office is full of those contradictions too... However, she too changed her hair style soon after her nay vote on the Iraq war.[/quote]
Empress, I think that all those changes of hair style have to do with personal consultants and hairstylists earning a living on and around Capitol Hill. It does not imply that the women who undergo them are selling out. What does the War on Iraq have to do with this?

[quote]She took a risk and lost. She kept mentioning the idea of speaking truth to power in her concession speech[/quote]
Well, I have heard her speak truth to power, in unmistakable fashion, not just saying that she did. I will have to do an internet search however to retrieve those precious moments of someone on Capitol Hill standing up to the President of the United States. I hope that my search will be successful, but I do trust my memory.

My point here is not to defend Cynthia McKinney, as I would be the first to admit that I probably do not know her as much as you did. I am just referring to the stands she took on the War On Iraq, and the idiocy of Bush's Supremacy campaign.

Perhaps I missed a lot and I am willing to admit it.

Empress Verite

Post by Empress Verite » Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:16 pm

Guy:

These personal consultants have tried to make their money with me too. And they are aggressive as heck and if you don't buy what they're selling then they bad mouth you and encourage others to ostracize you. I know this personally. I live in Miami where looks are the single most important thing in social life. This is looks city. And one must look as white as possible or face the consequences. At the same time whether you want to admit it or not she and the others sold out and gave in to pressures to change and well it may be the modern feminist way but I don't accept it.

There are so many books on this issue. Many of them I read when I was writing my dissertation proposal. Perhaps I should get you a bibliography. In Barbara Lee's office in 1990, I was invited to come and apply for a position. I happenned to be staying with my friend Adisa's mom who was Ms Lee's assistant. At the time, Ron Dellums was still the rep and she was in waiting sort to speak. Well, the position was something entry level to do some in take work with black teen moms on issues having to do with education and training. I was about to enter a graduate program at UC Berkeley and she thought that I could be very helpful like a good resource and role model for these young women. Besides, I had done some of this kind of work before and worked at the women's center etc...

The interview was cool but when they told me that I did not get the job I was surprised. And Barbara Lee's son was so polite and nice to me the entire time. My friend Adisa called from the East coast to tell me that his mother said that they did not hire me because of my hair style! They did not want someone with dreads for the position! Can you believe that! In addition to that, the folks in the office were trying to sell tickets for an event that they organized for Nelston Mandela. (He was making his US tour after being released. I had heard him in Amherst where he made his first stop. (His daughter attended UMass and my school was the first to divest back in the 1980s and there were many of his friend's children at Smith, Amherst and Holoyoke and Hampshire too). I did not feel that I could spend the little money that I had to buy an expensive ticket for that event and I will forever feel that had I bought the ticket they might have given me a second interview and "advised" me to change my hairstyle. Several of my professors and the chair of my program at Berkeley told me on many occasions that my hair would hinder my success and that it was inappropriate. So it matters and one should not give in to these pressure because they never stop. They won't stop until we all agree to do the Michael Jackson.

Best,
EV

Empress Verite

Sell Out or Compromise

Post by Empress Verite » Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:55 pm

Guy:

I wanted to add that I feel that there is a double standard for women in this whole thing. Black men don't have to perm or straighten their natural hair in order to be accepted. In fact, even black men with dreads are more accepted. And look at how Sharpton is ridiculed!

For instance why is it that no one comments on Karl Rove's, scary appearance. His bald head makes him look like some kind of creature from a scary movie. And to add the fact that he does all that mean stuff for Bush makes him look even scarier. He should have gotten a makeover with hair implants or something.

Condi Rice has changed quite a bit since accepting her new position. It has been found by analysts who studied her that she has gotten thinner (in my opinion perhaps due to her age. She's entered her 50s and her metabolism may have slowed down. But we can't discount the fact that as a dark skin black woman facing international pressures from folks who don't look too kindly on her kind she felt compelled to get thin.) Moreover, it was found that her skirts have gotten shorter in length too! Go figure!

And check out Latortue and Alexandre. They both needed makeovers if you ask me. Latortue should have lost weight and bleached that dark spot on his face. If he was a woman this would have been required or she would never have gotten selected. Certainly not a dark skin black woman. And Alexandre needed a course on public speaking in French. He was wooden and ashy. And his suits never fit him well either. He should have gotten a tailor. With all of the money that they stole and made they could have easily done these things. More than that the counsel of elders should have demanded it just as they would if these guys were women.

Lastly, I feel strongly that a Haitian female elected official should try to look like her constituents. Most of the Haitian women don't straighten or perm their hair because of personal beliefs, culture/tradition or financial reasons. Why is it that the folks in charge don't try to emulate that? Why do the downtrodden have to change to look like them? When will we ever have such a woman elected official. And I don't mean some light skin mama with natural straight hair eiher.

Best,
EV

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Sistahs, Where is Thy Victory?

Post by admin » Sun Nov 26, 2006 10:56 am

Thank you, Ezili Danto, for forwarding this insightful article.

[quote]Sistahs, Where is Thy Victory?
Female Power is Not Black Women's Power
by Thandisizwe Chimurenga

http://www.blackagendareport.com/005/00 ... ctory.html

“Black women must remain vigilant.”

Nancy Pelosi's ascendancy to Speaker of the House of Representatives has been hailed as smashing “through a political glass ceiling that has kept women out of the upper echelons of power throughout U.S. history.”

In the event that something happens to the President of the United States, the Vice-President then becomes the Commander in Chief; the next person in line would be the Speaker of the House, described as being the most powerful position in the legislative branch of government.

With Pelosi – said to have a strong record of support for abortion rights – as Speaker it is believed that she would be in the best position to keep anti-choice justices off of the Supreme Court should there be a vacancy.
That's all well and good, but there should be more to the story than that.

Well …

I'm waiting …

It looks as if simply putting a female face on a position of power is enough for some people, specifically the mainstream feminist movement – more specifically white women. But the case of Gloria Arroyo, President of the Philippines, should serve as a fresh reminder that this is woefully inadequate. Since taking office in 2001, critics of Arroyo say she has carved out a list of human rights violations longer than that of former President Ferdinand Marcos. At the end of October 2006, 761 community leaders and activists had been murdered under Arroyo's reign and of that number 80 were women, half of whom were members of GABRIELA, a mass-based, anti-imperialist Philippine women's organization.

Not exactly the model for female leadership one would hope for.

“Simply putting a female face on a position of power is enough for some people.”

But we don't have to go all the way to the Philippines to find disappointment.

According to womensenews.org, “With the Democrats in control of the House, women are in line to advance to high positions in party leadership and on committees. Four women are in line to take over control of House panels, and numerous other women are poised to control House subcommittees.”

Sadly and treacherously, Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney of Georgia won't be one of them.

On top of the usual fare of isolation, disrespect and contempt she has had to endure since September 11, 2001, the fall-out from McKinney's charge of racism after an assault by a Capitol Hill Police Officer earlier this spring was particularly ugly and included complete abandonment by her colleagues in the Democratic Party under the direct leadership of Nancy Pelosi.

It was Pelosi who, working through lackeys in the Congressional Black Caucus, put the word out that McKinney should be completely shunned and so it was – up to and including McKinney's so-called colleagues disappearing from the scene of a press conference where the Congresswoman was to apologize (!) for continuously speaking in the media on her assault as an instance of racist profiling by Capitol Hill Police. Of the 43 members of the Congressional Black Caucus only nine stood with her at the press conference, and that was after McKinney had to remind them of their commitment to do so.

It was Pelosi who, as House Minority Leader, denied Rep. McKinney her seniority status (after 10 years in Congress) when McKinney handily won re-election in 2004 after a well-orchestrated Republican-led campaign ousted her from office in 2002.

The treatment meted out to Cynthia McKinney under Nancy Pelosi's leadership and directives should be a cause for alarm for Black women and others. But there's more.

“Pelosi who, working through lackeys in the Congressional Black Caucus, put the word out that McKinney should be completely shunned and so it was.”

Nancy Pelosi has always been a staunch supporter of the state of Israel, remaining deafeningly silent on flagrant Israeli abuses of the human rights of the Palestinian and Lebanese people.

From the House Floor earlier this summer, after Hezbollah captured two Israeli soldiers in Lebanon spawning a murderous response by Israel, Pelosi expressed unwavering support for Israel's “right, and indeed …obligation, to respond.” That response by Israel this summer left over 750 civilians dead and over 1200 civilians injured - many of them children.

Palestinian women continue to suffer from the brutal occupation of their land by the state of Israel. Within the last six years, it is estimated by the Palestinian Health Information Center that 10 percent of pregnant women in the West Bank and Gaza who needed to give birth in medical centers or hospitals were delayed by Israeli forces at notorious “checkpoints” for 2-4 hours; during this period, a total of 68 women gave birth – right then and there – at these checkpoints while four mothers and 34 newborn babies died.

Speaking after the election, Pelosi reiterated her party's platform of “Six for ‘06” – the areas of focus for the new Congress' first 100 hours. National security, jobs and wages, energy independence, affordable health care, retirement security and college access for all are indeed important areas, but precisely where and how these areas encompass the case for the impeachment of George Bush, the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq, and the displaced victims of Hurricane Katrina has yet to be laid out.

Black women must remain vigilant as this new Congress settles in. Sisterhood may be global but it ain't immune to white supremacy.

Thandisizwe Chimurenga is a writer, activist, and the director of the Ida B. Wells Institute. She can be reached at idabwellsinstitute@gmail.com.

[/quote]

***************************************************
Forwarded by the Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network
***************************************************

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Post by admin » Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:06 am

It should be just as obvious that appointing a few black men and women in positions usually reserved to white males does not in itself advance the welfare of black Americans.

Clarence Thomas... Colin Powell... Condoleezza Rice....

I have also become very skeptical of Nancy Pelosi. I hope that she will prove me wrong, but her manipulation of the immigration reform debate in the House left me wondering about her convictions. And I already know more than I wish to know about Hillary Rodham Clinton. Immigrants, beware.

Tidodo_

Post by Tidodo_ » Thu Nov 30, 2006 12:14 pm

I look forward to the promotion of the first female president in the USA. This country remains one of the rare developed countries not to have honored women at the highest echelon. While I don't expect a female leadership to drastically change the policies of the US government, I hope it would have conisderable symbolic value that will affect attitudes and prejudices in the USA.

If there is a woman political agenda, my guess is that many women would have to have positions in the supporting power structure base for it to be carried out regardless of the gender of the leadership. Any new female leadership would now owe to the current power structure, which is male dominated and testosterone overweighted. As far as I understand political leadership, their incumbents are first moved by self-promotion, then, forces within the power structure. It leaves women, such as Pelosi or Clinton or their followers, little latitude to promote other agenda. To survive, they will to have to feed from the power structure's hands. Yes, their appointment won't trigger any social earthquake, but it will pave way for real change in the future, which only happens over time anyway.

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