Deportees from the US - thowing fuel on the fire

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Charles Arthur
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Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:35 am

Deportees from the US - thowing fuel on the fire

Post by Charles Arthur » Mon Aug 14, 2006 3:14 am

Latortue's reign was pretty much a disaster all round but I'll say one thing for him - he did at least raise the issue of 'criminal deportees from the United States' and made clear his contention that the US policy was a significant factor in the increasing crime rate in Port-au-Prince. How come the current government doesn't mention it?

See this from a KRT wire dated April 14th 2005:

"Federal immigration authorities have returned 59 Haitian nationals back to their homeland this week...Of the group deported Monday, 38 were felons convicted on charges ranging from armed robbery to sexual abuse to drug possession. The remainder were found guilty of violating federal immigration laws such as entering the United States illegally.

Among those removed: Jean Julex Alusma, 32, and Raymond Joseph, 56. Both were permanent legal U.S. residents.

Alusma had been convicted of nine counts of kidnapping with a deadly weapon and was placed in removal proceedings based on his aggravated felony convictions. He was ordered deported on Oct. 4, 2001, by an immigration judge.

Joseph was convicted on June 1, 1992, for attempted sexual battery on a minor."

Tidodo_

Post by Tidodo_ » Tue Aug 15, 2006 5:46 am

[quote]Latortue's reign was pretty much a disaster all round but I'll say one thing for him - he did at least raise the issue of 'criminal deportees from the United States' and made clear his contention that the US policy was a significant factor in the increasing crime rate in Port-au-Prince. How come the current government doesn't mention it?[/quote]

My guess is: there is so much to do! Where do you start? Feed the hungry! Provide shelter! If you use Abraham Maslow's hierrarchical theory of needs as a guide, you might feed before you provide security!

J-M.

Charles Arthur
Posts: 151
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:35 am

"..déportés seraient impliqués dans les actes de banditisme"

Post by Charles Arthur » Wed Aug 16, 2006 1:52 pm

Mercredi, 16 août 2006 Metropole

Le gouvernement décide d'incarcérer les haitiens déportés

Le Ministère de l'intérieur a adopté de nouvelles mesures en vue de mieux gérer le dossier des haitiens déportés par des pays de la région, a annoncé le directeur général dudit ministère, Lubrème Bien-aimé.

"Ces déportés qui ont purgé leur peine à l'étranger ne seront pas libérés dès leur arrivée en Haiti. Ils seront gardés dans un centre carcéral en attendant leur éventuelle réinsertion dans la société", a notamment déclaré à Radio Métropole le docteur Bien-aimé.

Des organisations de la société civile ont, à plusieurs reprises, critiqué le gouvernement pour la gestion du dossier des déportés. Selon ces organisations, ces haitiens expulsés notamment des Etats-Unis après avoir commis des actes répréhensibles devraient être placés en isolement pendant un certain temps en attendant leur réinsertion dans la société.

Selon des organisations de défense des droits humains, des déportés seraient impliqués dans les actes de banditisme recencés dans la région métropolitaine de Port-au-Prince. Depuis le refoulement régulier en Haiti de plusieurs dizaines de déportés, l'insécurité gagne du terrain dans le pays, font encore remarquer ces organisations.

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admin
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Post by admin » Wed Aug 16, 2006 3:11 pm

To re-incarcerate the deportees seems hardly a solution to me.

[quote]ls seront gardés dans un centre carcéral en attendant leur éventuelle réinsertion dans la société.[/quote]
Whoopty doo! They will be re-incarcerated, pending their eventual re-insertion (read release or break from jail) in society. Tell me what program please will be devised to prepare their "reinsertion" or are we simply talking about indefinite detention in the inhumane conditions that we already know about, in a manner that will breed even more dangerous criminals than they may have been to start with?

The assumption here is "IF THE U.S. HAS DEEMED IT NECESSARY TO DEPORT ANYONE, THEN THAT PERSON MUST BE A BANDIT AND MUST BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL AND QUITE ARBITRARY LENGTHS OF PENAL DETENTION BEFORE RELEASE TO CIVILIZATION," in other words the person must be placed in legal limbo (Haitian style or US style per the Pénitencier National or Guantanamo models). Vive La Justice, and everyone will sleep ever more secure in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

How simplistic is that point of view!

Every society has the right to protect its citizens, and that is the chief duty of any government. I am definitely not claiming that the U.S. deportees do not pose a threat to Haiti's security. But looking for facile solutions and making our judicial system the official restavek of the U.S. system will not lend themselves to greater security and lasting healing of our deeply wounded society. I am certain that some of the U.S. deportees may be hardened criminals, the "san manman" variety (whichever society has mostly contributed to produce them should in theory keep them). However, I am just as certain that some of the U.S. deportees have already been the victims of a disquietly unjust and often abusive U.S. judicial system and could be productive members of Haitian society. It may be a tricky thing to separate the wheat from the chafe, and one must of course weigh in our national security requirements, but what truly worries me is that, seemingly always, we hear about some easily fronted macho statements from government officials without a care to elaborate on a more sensible plan that might actually bring about a solution instead of some callous and carellesly implemented policy that will only make things worse in the long run.

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