My compliments to the Haitian People!

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My compliments to the Haitian People!

Post by admin » Wed Feb 08, 2006 10:13 am

From what I read, yesterday's elections were the most expensive ever!

It took supposedly two years to organize them. A period of time which was marred by sistemic violence, lawlessness, repression, jailing of political opponents, constitutional blunders, appeals to genocide, uneasy occupation or protectorate, open warfare or state of siege in the slums of the capital, etc. In spite of it all, the people knew that their interests would be better served by voting, and voting "en masse". They ignored the calls to boycott the elections, because to them a non-vote was a non-solution to their problems.

Is voting a solution? No, but it is the beginning of a solution. Yes, it was fraught with all sorts of danger, but the Haitian People braved the danger and earned the respect of the world. No one could have talked them out of voting. The Haitian People have more faith in the power of the v
ote, as a democratic process, than the citizens of so-called Western Democracies who never bother to vote in such high proportions.

Blessed be the Haitian people.

But voting is only the first step. Do not cheat them of their votes, and allow them to take further steps in the direction that they choose.

Do not kill them with your embrace or by the stinkiness of your breath.

Walk alongside the Haitian People, lending your support while re-invigorating your souls, but for God's sake, Let Haiti Live!

Ayisyen, sè-m ak frè-m yo, CHAPO BA!

Gelin_

Re: My compliments to the Haitian People!

Post by Gelin_ » Wed Feb 08, 2006 10:59 am

[quote]...Yes, it was fraught with all sorts of danger, but the Haitian People braved the danger and earned the respect of the world. No one could have talked them out of voting...[/quote]
Zonbi goute sèl li pa mande rete. Yes, it was a very historic day. Let's wait and see what the software will come up with. They say garbage-in-garbage-out, right?

gelin

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 08, 2006 11:16 am

Guy wrote: [quote]In spite of it all, the people knew that their interests would be better served by voting, and voting "en masse". [/quote]
Yes they did go out there and voted!!! Pa gen manti nan sa!!
Guy wrote:[quote]They ignored the calls to boycott the elections, because to them a non-vote was a non-solution to their problems. No one could have talked them out of voting. [/quote]
Yes no one could have!! Even tough some lunatics, out of this world, daylight dreamers, straight jacket prêt-à-porter, “whitemanphobics”, S.O.B.s were trying really, really, really hard to talk them out of their constitutional right.

Gwanmet la te la pou pwoteje yo!! An nou veye satan pou satan pa pike ke yo!!

Bravo Haitian people! You did it!!

Guy wrote:[quote]Is voting a solution? No, but it is the beginning of a solution. Yes, it was fra
ught with all sorts of danger, but the Haitian People braved the danger and earned the respect of the world. Blessed be the Haitian people. [/quote]
Yes Guy! Alleluia!!

From day one, I had faith on the Haitian people, and I knew that they will pull it out and they did!! They did it; they did with great conviction and determination!!!

Even tough at the beginning of the elections day, they had some difficulty getting everything done properly, but it's comprehensible, they are "novis" and so what!! The end result is more important!!

It was the first time in Haitian story that the people came out early in the morning and without fear to vote through an electronic system.

One observer said: "Regardless of the electronic system, their voice echoed loudly in the International Community's ears. Once again, they taught us a lesson of faith and determination"

Congratulation again for a job well done!!

Michel

Hyppolite
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Post by Hyppolite » Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:54 pm

I think that hopefully, the left will begin to see itself as a more cohesive whole, than parts that nag each other and try to destroy each other.

I am sure after yesterday, that the right is an intense moment of consolidation. That's good. The left on the other hand, despite differences that exist between and among them (which ought to exist in anyway), need to learn to see the big picture than just small ones.

After all, the vast majority of voters in Haiti taught the politicians and analysts from the left a crucial lesson: they don't need anyone's or party's approval to vote the way they think is best.

As it is beginning to trickle down, it's becoming quite clear that Preval did indeed win after the first round. I may be wrong but all I've gathered thus far is convincing me more that he won hands-down.
r

I am not asking people on the left by the way, to reject their belief; they have to learn to work through compromises within a much better structured and solidified framework. That shall be their best contribution to the causes of the disinherited in Haiti. I am sure today, and especially by Friday, that many among those who were suggesting that elections do not take place, are or will be quite pleased to learn who the next president is.

So it's obvious or it should be anyway, that political jusqu'auboutisme doesn't pay off in the short or long term.

Michel Nau_

Post by Michel Nau_ » Wed Feb 08, 2006 1:45 pm

Hyppolite wrote:[quote]After all, the vast majority of voters in Haiti taught the politicians and analysts from the left a crucial lesson:[/quote]
First of all, I have to congratulate the left for putting a good fight!
But they made some crucial mistakes.
They in coalition with International activists, started by asking the return of Aristide, while they knew that this action of removal of Aristide was orchestrated by the powerful International Community (French, Canada, and U.S.) and not necessarily by the Haitian people.

After the departure of Aristide, the leadership of the Lavalas Party was in chaos.
They said that they will not participate in the next “selection” and they will try to talk the people out of it.
Aristide did not designate anyone in charge even tough he knew that his return was in shaky ground.
The Party was floating “a
la derive” like a loaded boat without a captains, but full of experienced sailors.
They wasted their time looking at each others and see who will take charge of their destiny.
The silence of Aristide was deadly for the future of the Party. They did not realize that Aristide had a duck tape on his mouth, and was prohibited by his host country, South Africa not to make any comments that could have an impact on the outcome of the situation.
Time was running out.
They started realized that the election is for serious.
They panicked.
They started putting fake messages from Aristide out.
Aristide's counselor, Mr. Kurzban denounced “those messages were fake, and no one was in charge”.
They lost their credibility and don't know what to do!!
Time was running out! Some wise members requested for the Party to ally with others that can provide hope for the future. They decided to join MIDH, Bazin's Party.

Then came the grand entrance of former Prime Minister under Aristide, and
ex-president,Rene Preval under a new Party, LESPWA.
A well calculated move on the political chessboard on the Haitian politics.

Brilliant! Brilliant!!!

The rest is history……………………… in the making!!

A suivre!!

Michel

T-dodo

Post by T-dodo » Wed Feb 08, 2006 2:10 pm

Daprè enfòmasyon ke repòtè radio Ayisyien yo lan Miami, KEP la mande yo pou yo pa bay non kandida ke rezilta yo montre ka genyen lan sant ki finn konte vòt yo. Sepandan, li di ke endikasyon yo sè ke li pa sanble pral genyen yon dezièm tou pou kanpay pou prezidan an. Sa se gwo nouvèl!

Jean-Marie

Hyppolite
Posts: 80
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 12:39 pm

Post by Hyppolite » Wed Feb 08, 2006 2:52 pm

I thought that was weird in the first place, for HDP to claim what they did yesterday regarding the elections. I couldn't understand that they seemed to believe we would have had a 2nd round, considering the massive voting from all across the country.

It's good to know but I am getting more confident that the State can use its resources to organize a better second round for the municipal and legislative elections. I think the presidential was clearly going to fall on Preval's lap, considering how poorly the transition was played out by those in power.

Leonel JB

Post by Leonel JB » Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:07 pm

Mezanmi, labouyi a preske kwit...

Preval gen plis ke swasant pousan toujou, daprE sous mwen oudimwen, rivyE m...

Pa gen plas pou Magouy! Na ret tann poun wE si kOkOb yo pap leve koken...

MEN ANPIL, CHAY SIPOZE LEJE,

Leonel Jean-Baptiste

Anacaona_

Post by Anacaona_ » Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:31 pm

Leonel,

Nan ki sous ou byen rivyE (haha, ou wE mwen aprann byen nan men w) wap puize dlo fre sa a. Ou ta fè nou konnen kote sous la ye non pou nou ka al pran ou ti gout dlo fre tou.

Anacaona!

Leonel JB

Post by Leonel JB » Wed Feb 08, 2006 5:16 pm

Nana, mwen paka bay sous sa nan entènèt...

Lè nou wè, na pale plis.

Abraram genlè di sètase, Ayiti a mèyè fè on ti pa an avan.

Nou konnen depi m jwenn map lage yo atè pou nou.

Te gen on magouy ki tap makonnen. Men pèp la pi mètdam.

M ale,

leonel

T-dodo

Post by T-dodo » Wed Feb 08, 2006 7:31 pm

Like you all said or implied, this is a historic corner (carrefour) for Haiti. The next five years will determine whether its valiantly fought independence war was a fluke. The people did their part. It is up to the elite to do their part now. Let's hope they will not repeat history and learn from it instead.

In her book: “The March of Folly,” Barbara W. Tuchman quoted Samuel Coleridge to emphasize her point, how some political elite in history remained blind to the lessons of history and paid dearly for it: “If men could learn from history, what lesson it might teach us! But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives us is a lantern on the stern which shines only on the wave behind us.” Let's hope our opposition has learned the lessons of the past decade and does not intend to make the same mistakes again, once a new government they don't approve takes office.

Leonel JB

Post by Leonel JB » Thu Feb 09, 2006 12:05 am

Now, we can march towards a " Reconciliation Nationale". We can not afford to have division anymore.

Remember, "It's easier to point fingers, Than to offer a Helping-Hand".

Furthermore, "Wisdom is knowing what to do next, Virtue is doing it".

Haiti needs a Chance!

L'union fait la Force,

Leonel Jean-Baptiste

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