Anniversary Note from Suzanne Simpson

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Guysanto
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Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2003 6:32 pm

Anniversary Note from Suzanne Simpson

Post by Guysanto » Fri May 02, 2008 1:08 am

Thanks for not giving up on those who've been silent and inactive for so long. Happy b-lated birthday to WOH on your tenth year anniversary.

Guy, your passion and dedication to this site must have been a family affair to keep it intact! Such sacrifice allows visitors to observe, enrich their knowledge, and learn to respect different viewpoints in spite of our differences.

Jaf, you must be one of the deep roots we learned in History about the words of Toussaint Louverture, because you've sprouted motivation when no one else was around.

Anacaona, your consistency exhibits the quiet, beautiful, and undaunted strength of a Leoganaise.

Serge, well versed in many subject matters, and an intangible asset for WOH.

Tidodo, although you sometimes are MIA, your ability is a definite plus for WOH when you present issues of great importance, make an analysis, and inform on possible outcome. Kenbe la!

Senou, you may inspire just a few, but with collaboration and stability we'll get there one community at a time.

Dr. Malebranche, your feeling about creole/kreyol is mutual; Pwofesè Pistach however is providing access to many who've been left behind.

Marilyn, your contribution to WOH gives visitors access to dig deep and recognize nakedness.

La Patriote

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Guysanto
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Post by Guysanto » Thu May 08, 2008 7:32 am

Thank you, Suzanne, La Patriote, for taking the time to say a good word about that many of us. So much could be said about you too, but you have been the strong silent type. I have had now the pleasure to meet three delightful Leoganaises through my work at Windows on Haiti: Anacaona (or Ana!), Shelony, and you. That is in addition to your two sisters who drove all the way from Massachusetts and New Hampshire to New Jersey to participate in the community event I organized two years ago around social integration issues for Haitian immigrants. I met yet another sister of yours when Jafrikayiti and I were the scheduled speakers at the May 18, Haitian Flag Day event in Raymond, New Hampshire. [By the way, it's too bad you could not be there that day. My presentation was so-so, but Jafrikayiti's was compelling and extraordinary in every way. I feel certain that the tiny but most faithful Haitian community I have ever had the pleasure of meeting must remember still that fiery but so educational and so fact-based speech by our WOH brother in Ottawa, Canada. I felt proud to be associated to him, but on that day he completely eclipsed me and I did not mind one bit. I just learned one tiny lesson though: It's never a good idea to be the one to follow Jafrikayiti on stage... and I will not do it again.

I was and I am still energized by the spirit of your entire family and your lifetime service to the continued social improvement of your less fortunate brothers and sisters from Leogane. Everyone should take inspiration (if only they knew) from all the work that you do to maintain The Patriotic School of La Belle Fortune in Leogane, Haiti. You have so much going in your New England and Leogane communities that I am hoping that through my work at Windows on Haiti I will facilitate one day your meeting with other beautiful people from Leogane, like Shelony and Ana! This has been one of the most understated accomplishments of this web site: it has been the link between so many people who might otherwise never have met each other. And yet, we are kindred spirits. If I cannot manage to do anything more with Windows on Haiti, I will be happy to continue being that facilitator... because when beautiful minds meet, anything can happen for the good fortune ("la belle fortune") of our country of origin.

Please say hello for me to the family (you know who they are) who generously hosted me that weekend in Raymond, NH. Here was another example of an industrious Haitian. This guy started his business from scratch in this cold and rainy environment of this tiny community of Raymond (which I still think nobody has ever heard about, except for Haitians living nearby in Boston). Yet though sheer hard work and determination, he now dominates the AC Cooling and Heating business in the area, servicing most of the town's public works. As he became successful, he brought in more and more Haitian friends and their families to the area. With his quiet but sustained leadership, he has helped established this proud new community of Haitians in New England that makes a point of commemorating Haitian Flag Day every year, in a big way. I salute all of you for nurturing your love of Haiti and fellow Haitians in the most significant way possible.

Thanks again, La Patriote. Say hello for me to Jacqueline, Evelyne, and other members of the Lascaze family. A big up to Brother Morisseau who made it possible for me to meet all of you.

Guy

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