The UN Security Council extends the mandate of MINUSTAH by eight months

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Zanfanginen

The UN Security Council extends the mandate of MINUSTAH by eight months

Post by Zanfanginen » Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:07 am

From Marguerite Laurent's email post that I've received

[quote]The UN Security Council extends the mandate of MINUSTAH by eight months and appeals for a continuation of the operations against the armed bands

sectors continue to criticize the lethal raids of the UN mission in the populist districts | AHP News - February 15, 2007 - English translation (Unofficial) | Source: <mlhaiti>


Port-au-Prince, February 15, 2006 (AHP)- The UN Security Council voted this Thursday, February 15, to extend the mandate of the Unites Nations Stabilization Force in Haiti (MINUSTAH) following a compromise reached between the United States and China.

In Resolution 1743, the Security Council explained its decision by the fact that the situation in Haiti continues to "threaten international peace and security" despite the progress that has been made.

In a report published in December 2006, former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan had recommended a one year extension of the mandate of MINUSTAH (to 2008), which expired this February 15.

Mr. Annan's recommendation of a one year extension of the mission's mandate was supported by a group of countries consisting of the United States, Canada, Brazil, France and Great Britain, but China has no diplomatic relations with Haiti and opted instead for a six month extension of MINUSTAH's mandate.

A middle ground was found between the 12 months sought by Kofi Annan and the six months favored by China. After the resolution was adopted, the representative from China nevertheless said he regrets that the mission was extended longer than the six months that he said is normally the rule in such missions.

The Security Council praised the progress made by Haiti, in particular the presidential, legislative and local elections of 2006 and the establishment of a constitutional government to replace the de facto regime of Gérard Latortue, who was placed in office the day after the forced departure of President Aristide.

The resolution urges MINUSTAH to continue its increased tempo of operations in support of the PNH against armed gangs, to expand its support for strengthening State institutions in Port-au-Prince and especially
outside the capital, to help the government reform the national police as well as establish a unified justice sector (and prison system) reform strategy.

The resolution urges the UN Mission to redouble its efforts to reorient its disarmament, demobilization and reintegration resources toward a comprehensive community violence reduction program.

The Council resolution also asked MINUSTAH to expand its support in strengthening State institutions by providing specialized expertise to key ministries (that it did not name).

The Council also requested that the United Nations country team and the humanitarian and development actors implement activities aimed at effectively meeting Haiti's population's immediate and long-term needs, improving living conditions and reducing poverty.

Many sectors question the slow pace of the international community in releasing funds promised at the last donors' conferences in Port-au-Prince and Belgium. This sluggishness has prevented the elected authorities from putting in place structures favoring the country's development and fighting reducing poverty.

The MINUSTAH forces began arriving in Haiti in the beginning of May 2004, replacing a force largely dominated by the US that had intervened at dawn on February 29 to compel President Aristide to leave the country after armed gangs formed with former Haitian soldiers and convicts had taken up arms and terrorized the populations of several Haitian cities such as Gonaives, Cap-Haitien, Hinche and Les Cayes.

MINUSTAH, composed of 7500 troops, was almost the only support for the de facto government that was parachuted into office on February 29, 2004, having no popular support.

While MINUSTAH has managed to dissuade people from staging another coup d'etat or attacking the National Palace, the Office of the Prime Minister or the ministries, it has indeed been the object of numerous criticisms because of its slow progress in curbing insecurity and kidnappings.

Sectors close to the private sector and a fringe of civil society even accused the UN soldiers on the eve of the February 2006 elections of involvement in some of the abductions because the UN mission refused to intervene energetically in the populist districts.

MINUSTAH began to benefit from the support of those same quarters once it began its raids into the shantytown of Cité Soleil to neutralize the bandits, however the raids produced dozens of innocent victims.

According to the Haitian Platform of Human Rights Organizations, 74 people were killed in interventions by the foreign troops between February 2004 and December 2006.

The most lethal raid was on December 22, 2006 in Cité Soleil, when more than 22 people were killed and several dozen injured.

Conscious of their lack of public support, MINUSTAH organized on Wednesday, the day before the expiration of its mandate, a guided tour seen as a public relations event in the Boston neighborhood of Cité Soleil in the aftermath of a muscular military operation.

UN blue helmets disguised themselves as clowns to distract the children and distributed hot meals, drinking water and medicine.

However, most area residents remained were not impressed, commenting that they are not about to forget so quickly the funerals caused by the blue helmets through their various raids.

AHP February 15, 2007 3:00 PM[/quote]

Zanfanginen

Post by Zanfanginen » Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:12 am

[quote]The Security Council praised the progress made by Haiti, in particular the presidential, legislative and local elections of 2006 and the establishment of a constitutional government to replace the de facto regime of Gérard Latortue, who was placed in office the day after the forced departure of President Aristide.
[/quote]
That's a lie! There has been no progress in Haiti with the killing of innocent people in Site Soley and other slums of the capital, the raping of innocent girls by MINUSTAH's soldiers and the inaction of Preval-Alexis governement to implement policy that can benefits everyone. This PR crap pulled by the UN is sickening.

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